How to film an EPIC wedding video

By WeddingMix

How to film an EPIC wedding video: A beginner’s guide to action shots

Kristi-Chris-WeddingMixThere’s something special about couples that opt to tie the knot in the great outdoors. Not only does the bride and groom’s venue hints at their appreciation of natural beauty, it also showcases taste for action and adventure!

From skiing and snowboarding to kayaking and stand up paddleboarding, I’ve seen a ton of amazing wedding video footage filmed by adventurous couples over the years. If you’re thinking about including outdoor activities into your wedding weekend, check out these 7 videography tips for action filming to make your wedding video epic!

  1. Create a shot list based on the length of your wedding

Are you having a multi-day event? Make sure that you get the whole wedding story, not just the wedding day!

For example, Kristen and Greg’s rustic wedding in wine country, she included the journey to the mountainous wedding as part of her shot list.

  1. What pre- and post-wedding events do you have scheduled?

Most likely you will have a rehearsal dinner. If you have lots of out of town guests, you may also have some pre-wedding parties or activities going on. Those fun impromptu events are where you’ll get the most candid moments of your guests. It’s also where you’ll get to spend the most time with them. You’ll be pretty busy on the wedding day itself.

And don’t forget the honeymoon! It’s all part of your entire wedding adventure. Check out the “extra guests” at Javier’s rehearsal dinner video. And the double honeymoon at the end. Mountain climbing and pro football in one trip!

  1. If you’re filming with a phone, hold the camera sideways.

Have you ever seen a Hollywood film with black bars on the side? That’s what your footage is going to look like if you hold your phone vertically. Make sure to hold the phone sideways, so the video clips will look good in wedding video later.

  1. Be Your Own Tripod

Megan_Christopher_WeddingMixIf you’re taking video clips longer than a few seconds, your hands will naturally start to drift downwards. Best bet is to be your own tripod: grip the phone with two hands and gently brace your elbows against the top of ribs. Super important to remember whilst filming the first dance!

  1. Provide Interview Questions.

I provided a list of simple questions to some of my friends that I had setup in advance to assure we were getting some personalized messages on our videos. Another great way to personalize your video is to interview your future-spouse. It’s nice for those dedicated clips to work their way into the final wedding video!

  1. One Word: GoPro

GoPro’s are high-def personal cameras, Rustic_weddingmix_ Kateusually in extreme action video photography. They are known for being rugged, wearable, and lightweight in unusual places such as attached to a helmet, bicycle, or boat. Are you and your spouse rock climbing or white water rafting after taking the plunge? How cool would it be to capture that view for your wedding video!

  1. Most importantly, plan really cool activities for a really cool wedding video!

Don’t forget to take advantage of all the fun you can have with an outdoor wedding getaway! Whether you want an over-night ski trip with your bridal party or a post-wedding standing up paddleboard excursion, make sure you plan something EPIC to kick off your new adventure as a married couple!

Author Bio:

The WeddingMix team is dedicated to capturing all the epic, candid, and heartwarming wedding moments through the eyes of those who love you most. Not only is the WeddingMix app + HD rental cameras a personalized and affordable alternative to boring wedding videos, it’s an easy and fun way to capture all of your wedding guests’ photos and videos in one organized spot! After the wedding, your favorite video clips are turned into a custom edited wedding video for you to re-watch for years to come.

Keep It Local

By Courtney DiFiore

Growing up in the Adirondacks, a love for fresh, local produce was instilled in me; I could walk into my backyard and pick my own berries. When I moved to Vermont, I found it even easier to stock up on locally made products. Stop by any farmer’s market and you’re surrounded with the freshest veggies and the most unique hand crafted goodies.

Typically, you’ll find me wandering the South Londonderry Market, but I do take the time to drive into Dorset on occasion. I have a weakness for Earth Sky Time’s gluten free multigrain bread; it’s the best gluten free bread I’ve ever had and now the only one I’ll buy.

Where do you go and what’s your favorite ‘must-have’?

Check out local Farmer’s Markets and their hours here.

Wanderlust re-dux

By Guinevere Hilton

I walked into my first workshop at Wanderlust at Stratton Mountain with an abundance of body image issues, and a well developed arsenal of was to deal with them. I was ready. I knew that I could find lots of reasons to hate on myself, to compare and despair, to judge, belittle and then hop on the self-improvement train (which for me usually means immediately becoming vegan and ending the day curled up in a ball with a pint of Ben and Jerry’s in one hand and a pork chop in another). Not this time. No way. I am 40 now! I’ve got this covered. I have spent the last year making it my mission to accept my body and create a place for others’ to love, celebrate and accept theirs. I figured that the chances of this issue rearing up and dominating my experience were slim to none. I was actually excited to show off how far I’d come.

I may have jumped the gun a wee bit. I walked in to the tent and all around me I saw what I wasn’t: thin, beautiful, born with innate fashion sense and a stylist. I was immediately thrown back to being 20 again: living in New York City, trying to be an actress when the flavor of the times was cookie cutter skinny. I wanted to hide. I actually started to cry on my mat. I was sitting there, about to take a workshop with two of my most favorite teachers, Elena Brower and David Harshada Wagner, and I felt so gross, less-than and ashamed that I was considering walking out. I went to the corner and filmed a little video expressing my dismay and concern. My idea was to turn this experience into content for My Real Yoga Body. Then I watched the video, was horrified by how old I looked and promptly deleted it and went back to my mat to continue weeping.

Class began. David started to lead us through a meditation. He opened with the reminder to move away from “self-improvement” and towards being our best selves. Thank you. I softened a little … which just made me cry more. He kept reminding us that “You deserve the best of life, and life deserves the best of you”.   Elena led us through a powerful asana practice; they tag-teamed taught our group in the most loving, authentic and no-nonsense way. I began to move away, at least a little, from my analyzing, self-improvement mind, and towards a part of me that at least was open to the idea that maybe it doesn’t matter so much that I am not a Lululemon model. Yet. Just kidding. Maybe.

There is a reason I started the My Real Yoga Body project, and it is not because I embrace and exemplify body-positivity. It is because my relationship to my body is my embarrassing Achilles heel. I hate that my body, my desire to be what I am not, is one of my biggest challenges. It is an old and familiar nemesis. And I am ready to, as they say in Buddhism, invite it to tea. And then, as I say in Guinevere-ism, smash it over the head with a scone.

At the end of the workshop, David gave us some tips on enjoying Wanderlust and getting the most out of it. The one that stuck with me was about conserving your energetic budget and being careful what you laid your eyes upon. He noted that there was so much exciting activity, interesting people, and neat stuff to buy that the experience could be exhausting and depleting. This helped me SO much through my time at Wanderlust. I reminded myself again and again to choose wisely. To spend a little time window-shopping, and more time looking at trees, mountains and sky. To spend less time sizing people up and wondering where they got those pants and more time making eye contact, laughing, and listening.

I had an amazing time. In the end, body stories did not dominate my experience. They were tempered and calmed by the yoga, the teachers, and the warm, friendly people I met. They became smaller and joy became larger. And again, I am left grateful for the mystery school that is yoga.

 

About the Author:

g hiltonGuinevere Hilton lives on a big lake in New Hampshire with her two beautiful boys. She is the founder of My Real Yoga Body (myrealyogabody.com, https://www.facebook.com/myrealyogabody, and on Twitter and FB #myrealyogabody.), a home for embracing all the various shapes and flavors that make up real yoga bodies. She is eternally grateful to her yoga practice, love that keeps buoying her up and the constantly surprising nature of life. Xoxo!!

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The Goddess Within

By Anne Reynolds

Anne yoga 1.0 If you had told me fifteen months ago that I would discover my inner goddess through the practice of yoga I probably would’ve spit out whatever I was drinking and told you to lay off the home brewed Kombucha.

I didn’t particularly care for yoga or those that practiced it. In my opinion the typical yogi or yogini could best be exemplified by my old college roommate Chloe and step grandmother, Virginia. Chloe was beautiful, married rich and looked amazing in her Lululemon pants. Yet the only yoga pose she ever practiced was a forward fold when she was trying on shoes at Nordstrom’s. My step-grammy, on the other hand, was stuck in the counterrevolution of the sixties. She preached free love, women’s liberation and spent way too much time in her transparent white leggings. Her favorite pose was snow plow but only if she had a predominately male audience.

Anne yoga 2.0Admittedly, my knowledge of yoga was limited but that didn’t stop me from dismissing all yoga practitioners as phony and pretentious. These two women were definitely polar opposites but they were both classic examples of posers, yoga posers.

I had no desire to try yoga but it found me anyway. It didn’t knock politely on the front door of my intolerance. Instead it snuck through the back door of my people-pleasing issues and inability to say no. Stratton had just opened a brand new yoga studio and yoga was quickly becoming one of the most popular non-snow activities at the resort. The consultant for the new studio was also a yoga teacher and we would meet occasionally to discuss employee involvement with our health & wellness initiative. One afternoon she mentioned that she was having trouble finding someone to help with class check-in. Before I could stop myself I said “I’ll do it!” in my best please be my friend, people-pleasing voice. Not one to pass up on free labor she gave me my schedule.

I woke up with a migraine on the day of my first shift. I debated long and hard about calling in sick but people- pleasers don’t call in on their first day.  With a long sigh I ripped off the tags of my new yoga pants and went to the studio. I was allowed to join the class after everyone was checked in so against my better judgment and rapidly increasing head pain I unrolled a mat, stood there in my socks and figured how hard could yoga be anyway?

Yoga, as it turned out is hard, very hard. I quickly discovered that I was about as flexible as the LTR (learn to ride) snowboard that I could never seem to learn to ride on. I could barely touch my knees let alone my toes and jumping back to plank position or anything closely related was not happening. By the end of class I was sweating profusely, completely out of breath and sure I had torn every tendon in my body.

Ironically it was the last pose (Savassana a.k.a Corpse pose) that I found the most intimidating. I understood that all I had to do was lie there and play dead for five minutes but the thought of being still longer than 30 seconds with just my own thoughts seemed torturous.   While I was lowering myself down on my mat I made a decision that if I couldn’t stand it I would get up, quietly excuse myself and go to the restroom where I would spend the rest of the class checking email on my iPhone.

Something happened during that last pose that prevented me from following through on my planned escape. I don’t know exactly how to describe it but once I settled my body on the mat and started to breathe deeply I felt something inside of me begin to soften and open up. When we finally sat up I felt physically lighter and an overwhelming sense of peace. On the way to my car I noticed that my head didn’t hurt anymore. My migraine was completely gone! That was good enough for me and from that moment on I was hooked.

I now practice yoga daily. I don’t go to class to parade around in the latest yoga fashions or scope out the scene. I also have no plans on giving up all earthly pleasures to move to an Ashram in India. I don’t practice for the physical workout either but I am in the best shape of my life. I am amazed at what my body can do and how strong I am. I can not only touch my toes but I can do handstands and almost a full split.

I practice yoga for one reason only: to feel connected. It’s as simple and complicated as that. When I am able to connect my mind and body with the universe I am able to experience authentic happiness. Does this mean I’ve become a spiritually enlightened goddess? Hardly. Fifteen minutes ago I just used an inordinate amount of force and half a can of Raid to kill a spider. I wish I was in a constant state of Zen but alas, I am still a mere mortal on most days. I continue to struggle with letting go, people pleasing and saying things that I later regret. It’s not uncommon in yoga class for an instructor to remind us to “meet yourself on your mat”. This truism has taught me that the most important relationship you should have is the one with yourself. This means I have to accept me exactly as I am right now. Practicing yoga has given me the ability to understand that my weaknesses are equally as important as my strengths. After all, if I wasn’t a consummate people-pleaser I might not have discovered yoga when I did. When I can accept myself completely I am better able to accept others including the ones I love.

Yes, as it turns out yoga has shown me the path to my inner goddess. This is our true self and everyone has an inner god or goddess. Some days are harder than others to connect with her but when I do I know without a doubt that she is all that is good. She is pure love, beauty and light. She is me.

Once Isn’t Enough – A Profile of Matthew McPhillips

By Courtney DiFiore

It’s a funny thing, mountain life. There’s an allure to it and the lifestyle engulfs all who take part. The atmosphere is electric and mellow all at once creating the perfect oxymoron. Matthew McPhillips experienced the pull of this energy in 2006 when he first moved to Stratton Mountain. Now, 8 years later, he is immersed in the mountain culture as the Head Golf Professional.

“I was fortunate enough to be given the keys to an operation at age 25, and I take great pride in that. The fact that I am now entering my fourth season [as Head Pro], living on the complete opposite side of the world to every member of my immediate family just goes to show my dedication to the position,” shares McPhillips.

There’s debate as to whether it’s something in the water, air or Kool Aid that infects those that find their way to the mountain, but one thing’s for sure, there’s something special going on at Stratton that keeps people coming back. All year long, license plates from around the North East and beyond turn up in our parking lots. Before visitors reach the mountain they begin to feel the magic of Southern Vermont. The rolling hills and vibrant colors of green set the stage for a true scenic trip.

“Being close to major cities is nice but being able to literally get in your car and drive nowhere in particular…that is a luxury that a lot of people cannot access in their urbanized lifestyles,” explains McPhillips. The bends and curves of Southern Vermont roads become hypnotic to travelers. Sights of native wildlife create excitement and that’s the moment mountain life sweeps you off your feet leaving you breathless and wanting more.

When McPhillips was asked what keeps him coming back to Stratton after all this time, his response was simple, “I love the work I do and the beautiful Green Mountain State that is Vermont. I’ve found the right balance between work and play enabling me to stay active on a daily basis.”

Everyone has their own reasons for sticking around and though different, the one thing they share is Stratton. Have you found your reason to keep coming back?

The Benefits of Not Training

team-watermelon-preraceOur guest blogger this month is Lauren, an RRCA certified coach and the mastermind behind Health on the Run. Her running and wellness blog has been a favorite among the sneakered set since 2010. Since then, she and her husband have started a new life (and a new family!) in Southern Vermont. Follow her adventures in running in the Green Mountains.

 

This blog was originally written in July 2013, but the content is timeless. Enjoy!

Some runners run purely for recreation. A few miles a couple of times a week, just to stay in shape/burn off calories/eat that extra slice (or three!) of pizza on Friday night.

While I can’t argue with the fact that these are great benefits (and I’ve used running to justify splurges more than once), I personally need more out of the sport. Like many of you reading this, I thrive off actively training — the goal setting, the hard work, the endorphins, the races. I complain about it sometimes (of course), but I generally like the structure of a training schedule. It keeps me accountable, keeps me motivated, and helps me feel accomplished. For the past several years, I’ve gone right from one training cycle to the next…hitting a goal, resetting, working towards another. I love the sense of order and consistency it brings to my life.

But that kind of schedule can also lead to burnout. And now that I’m not training (not really), I have to admit that there are some very nice benefits to the time off. Especially when it’s summer in Vermont, and you don’t have to worry about fitting in your long run when there’s all sorts of other fun outdoor adventures to be had.

I still set goals for myself each week. I track my workouts, and come up with a set number of days I want to run and a certain number of miles I want to hit. Of course it’s all sort of arbitrary at this point, but it’s really the only thing that keeps me motivated. And the structure brings a sense of normalcy to an otherwise crazy time.

Sometimes, however, it’s good to put those goals to the side…something that’s a lot easier to do when there’s no race on the line. No one really cares how many miles I run every week except for me, and running isn’t the only form of physical activity (sometimes it’s easy to forget this when I’m in the middle of a training cycle!). In fact, there are other things I like doing just as much.

cascade falls_1

Like spending the day hiking up a nearby mountain.

cascade falls_17weeks

It’s so funny to me how I can feel absolutely fine (and like my old self) while running a race, but not while walking at an easy pace…well, not when that walk involves climbing a mountain, anyway. I love hiking, but it’s embarrassing how easily I get out of breath now. And I don’t particularly like the fact that I’m lagging behind Evan the entire way.

But, other than my damaged pride, hiking really is a great workout. And I can’t think of many other ways I’d rather spend a day. If there ever comes a day when I give up running for good, I think I’ll just dedicate my life to hiking mountains all over the country.

On Saturday, we headed to Mt Ascutney, the site of the crazy trail race I ran last fall (but not the same trail). It was a tough, but beautiful hike. About halfway up, we stopped for lunch at the top of a waterfall. Eating sandwiches with our feet hanging off the edge of the “world” and the endless green mountains all around is basically my idea of heaven on earth.

weathersfield trail_cascadefalls lunch

cascade falls_viewPictures don’t really do it justice

The day was humid, but not overly hot, which made it perfect for hiking. And although it was a little cloudy at the top, the mountain ranges still seemed to stretch on forever.

Mt Ascutney_top

Have I mentioned lately just how much I love Vermont?

On our way back home, we happened to drive by an orchard advertising freshly picked berries. So we just had to stop to pick up some strawberries and blueberries, which we devoured within 24 hours (in the form of strawberry shortcake and blueberry pancakes).

The next day we continued our Vermont adventures by running from another waterfall…this time, one that’s a fairly well-known spot for swimming on hot summer days. We drove out there with our towels and ran an easy (hot!) 4 miles out and back from the falls. The sole purpose of the run was to work up enough of a sweat so that the icy cold water would actually feel refreshing.

Turns out, it’s going to take a lot more than a 4-mile run on a hot sunny July day to make that water feel good. It was so cold that going under momentarily took my breath away.

buttermilk falls

But there’s nothing quite like an ice bath in a Vermont river. I think if I could finish every run at a waterfall/swimming hole, I’d be way more likely to take regular ice baths during training.

IMG 3913

And if I can spend every weekend frolicking in the Green Mountains, I’d say life is pretty good. Living in Vermont has its downsides, but weekends like this past one remind me why we chose to live in this state…and how lucky we are to be here, no matter how long it ends up being.

And I have to admit that it makes me pretty happy to not have any sort of long race to train for. There will always be another training cycle. I plan to enjoy this downtime as much as I possibly can.

Put Your Best Foot Forward This Spring!

By Paula Pelkey

Put your best foot forward this Spring!

Hibernation is something that happens every year for the bears that inhabit the woods surrounding Stratton Mountain Resort. Right about the time we break out our ski boots and hit the slopes, bears are laying down for their winter nap. Something else goes into hibernation at that time too, our feet.

We squeeze our feet into our ski boots. Boots that we need snug to keep us steady as we cruise down the mountain. Boots that can pinch and rub if not fitted just right. Boots that can put pressure on our toenails when we are skiing especially hard. Boots that support our ankles and arches yet still make those muscles sore and achy after a full day on the slopes.

Often times we overlook the importance that well-loved feet provide in our lives. They provide a sturdy foundation for our bodies. They keep us upright and balanced. They transport us from one place to the next. They quite literally carry the weight of our lives upon them. Therefore they deserve to be treated well.

Flexible and well maintained feet are a sign of good health. They show that you as a person care enough for yourself that you look after even the most overused and rugged part of you. Tension and stress often hide out in your feet. Getting regular foot massage or reflexology can keep that tension from building up, affecting your balance and then effecting the alignment of your body.

Keeping the nails clipped and clean will ward off ingrown toenails and the growth of fungus. Removing the dead cuticle skin and bits of splintered nail will help encourage stronger nails. Any areas with tough, callused skin will be softened and gently buffed away leaving behind softer skin.

Ski season is over, let’s bring those toesies out of hibernation! Come into the Day Spa at Stratton Village for your foot massage and pedicure. Add a little spring in your step with a splash of color or keep it au natural like our beautiful Vermont surroundings.

The Day Spa at Stratton Village will be open for our summer season May 23, 2014.

Our hours will be:
Friday and Saturday 9:00am-6:00pm
Sunday and Monday 10:00am-5:00pm
(802) 297-4772

Insider’s Guide: A Co-Founder’s Tips for Wanderlust Stratton

By Jeff Krasno, Co-Founder of Wanderlust Festival

Our Insider’s Guide series offers new ‘lusters a peek into our festivals and introduces veterans to fresh adventures. In this installment, festival co-founder Jeff Krasno provides his tips & musings for a memorable Wanderlust Stratton. Be sure to check out our first post in this series: 25 Experiences You Don’t Want to Miss (Wanderlust Festival Summer 2014)

• • •

One of the aspects I love about Wanderlust is how each festival takes on the essence of its natural and cultural surroundings. This is particularly true at Stratton Mountain.

The beauty of the Vermont landscape is hushed. The mountains roll, the grass is lush, the sky often heavy. The colors blur like a watercolor and the energy is peaceful, old. If our Tahoe festival is Wagnerian with its high, jagged mountains thrusting into the thin air, then Vermont is more Debussy, impressionistic and dreamy.

Sunset at Stratton Mountain, Vermont

photo by Ashley Daige

Driving around Vermont, it is hard to find a town without a green market. Vermont didn’t so much rediscover the local food movement as it has served as an example for local-based economy. From maple syrup to cheeses to micro-brews, Vermont is the national capital of the cottage and craft industry. Even scaling brands like Cabot continue to work closely with local farmers.

On your way to the festival I highly suggest stopping at the Grafton Cheese Factory, on Route 30, on your drive just out of Brattleboro. See the inner workings of the factory and stock up on some cheese for the trip. A little further down the road, just before you get to Newfane, you can pull off at Dutton’s Farm Stand. Strawberries are perfectly in season during festival time. You can pick your own for CHEAP!

Even as Wanderlust Stratton continues to grow (and this year is going to be the biggest yet), the festival has retained a tight-knit, community feel. Snug in the shadow of the mountain and surrounded by dense summer forest, Stratton gives us a unique opportunity to create an intentional community. As you make the final turns up the access road – local victuals in tow – you’ll see what I mean. Stratton really becomes a little Wanderlust village, with yogis blissfully relaxing on the central lawn and strolling down the cobblestone walkways.

Read the rest of Krasno’s Insider’s Guide at Wanderlust.com

Planes, TRAINS & Automobiles

By Betsy Leiter

I recently had reason to travel via Amtrak from Stratton Mountain Resort to Penn Station, 34th Street ,  New York City.  The logistics in arriving at my destination were surprisingly simple and streamlined, so I thought our readers would appreciate some of the how to’s in making their own arrangements.

My trip started at 8:30am on a cold and wintery Tuesday morning up at Stratton. Local roads were clear and well plowed. Highways were spotless.  I drove Route 30, south on Vermont 7, over the 279 Bennington Bypass, and then West on New York Rte 7 to Rte 9. Follow 787 South about 8 miles, then take all exits to Rensselaer. Soon you’ll see well marked roads to Amtrak.  Follow those for long term parking, and enter the  parking garage.  One way the drive was  1.5 hours.

The parking garage rises up several levels, and you’ll be surprised how many cars are parked there, which is a vote of confidence about safety.  You’ll enter the station, and walk into a pleasant, warm waiting room complete with a well-stocked deli, restrooms, a car rental agency, a large ticket window staffed by real people who are very knowledgeable about the different routes, real paper maps and schedules (if you can remember how to read these), and a post office. Notifications on train arrivals and departures are easily read on multiple LCD screens throughout the room. My train, the Ethan Allen, departed on time at 11:15am.

The ride from Rensselaer to New York City takes about 2.5 hours. Make reservations on a route that includes the café car. I had a chicken salad sandwich, potato chips and a soda. All good.  Most passengers passed the time on lap tops or mobile devices since you can pick up wifi as soon as you enter the train. There are outlets in every seat cubicle for charging your device too. The train make quick stops at Hudson, Rhinecliff, Poughkeepsie, Croton-Harmon, and Yonkers before you arrive at Penn Station.  I arrived in New York City in the early afternoon, and was able to complete my business, catch a show, and return on the 5:47 the following evening. Thanks to technology, you can get on the train showing just an eticket on your mobile device, no printed copy necessary. In Albany, my car was right where I left it, and you pay a real attendant when you leave — $12 a day.  This is a good place to get rid of the $1 coins you may have collected from the MTA subway machines.

As I drove back to Stratton, relaxed and glowing, it was obvious that this service was excellent – clean, convenient, and fast. Already I was planning some personal trips that would allow me to get to the City without the complexities of inner City driving and parking. Amtrak offers severals discounts for children, seniors, and AAA consumers.  You can bring 2 pieces of luggage, one of which may be your skiis as long as they are not over 72” long. The other contains your personal belongings that can’t weigh over 50 lbs. There is plenty of storage room overhead and at the end of each car.  You’ll need to rent a car to drive from Amtrak to Stratton, and there’s a car rental agency on site.

So if you’d like a hassle free way of getting out of the City and spending some leisure time in the heart of New England, take Amtrak, and give it a try. You can leave New York Friday evening, and be back in time – refreshed and recharged —  for the Monday morning commute.