Goals for the Season

By Charlie Reetz

charlie photoThere’s one question I ask myself at the beginning of every season. What are my goals to accomplish before the snow melts? So for those of you just as amped as I am for the season, I’d like to share with you a few of my aspirations for the winter.

101 Days

Accomplishing one hundred days on the hill is a challenge already, but I want to add that extra day just because. On every mountain there is a society of men and women who are able to get in those days. Some call it the 100 club others may call it #100happydays but it’s certainly a goal every serious skier and snowboarder strives to achieve toward the end of the season.

Going Inverted

A back flip is not as hard as people may think; it’s just a matter of having the guts to do it. I have tried it before but haven’t landed it properly quite yet. There’s also what’s called spinning cork which all my park rats will know about but for those who don’t it’s a way of spinning and flipping at the same time. As an avid terrain park goer you always have a list of tricks you’ve got dialed in and some tricks to work on for the season.

Pizza Everyday

… And not gaining a single pound. HAHA

Covering Every Trail

It may be a part of the job, but the fact is I haven’t been down EVERY trail here at Stratton.

Pond Skimming

Believe it or not in all my years of skiing and snowboarding I have yet to pond skim at the end of the season.

Let me know what your goals are for this season and I’ll be happy to see you achieving each one this season. Right now I’m going for a slice!

November Gear Guide

Struggling to find pieces that will smooth the transition from fall to winter? The Stratton Gear Guide is here to help. Outfit your adventures in Stratton’s Village, where you’ll find all of these items and more.
GearGuide_November_web

Find full descriptions of all featured items HERE!

1. Women’s Juno Pant at Lole

2. Coal Hats at Syd & Dusty’s

3. Fall Flannels at First Run

4. Garbo Vest at
Dashing Bear

5. Men’s Fuse Brigandine Jacket at The North Face

6. Women’s Arya Trench at Burton

7. Season Leasing at Village Rentals

8. Tent Sale at Stratton Sports

Time for snow tires

By Courtney DiFiore

This weekend is calling for snow upwards to 5 inches by Sunday morning. Can you believe that? Despite our first snow last weekend, I’ve still neglected to switch my all-season tires for winter. I can’t possibly be the only one behind the eight ball on this one. Actually, now that I think of it, I did overhear a co-worker making an appointment today. There’s hope for me yet. As a result of this realization that I’m NOT ‘winter ready,’ I created a to-do list to keep me on track.

What am I missing and more importantly, what are you missing? Ready or not, winter is coming.

  1. Get snow tires
  2. Schedule oil change
  3. Make emergency winter kit to store in trunk
    This includes things like a flashlight, blanket, salt (dirt or kitty litter work too), batteries, jumper cables etc.
  4. Put in storm windows
  5. Stack fire wood
  6. Body conditioning (Check out this recent post on conditioning for winter)
  7. Tune equipment
  8. Get out the old base layers, jacket and so on
  9. Buy season pass or lift tickets early
  10. Watch ski and snowboard videos!

Preparing For 2014-15 Winter Season

By Courtney DiFiore

Imagine beginning your day with a beautiful sunrise over lush green mountains. As you gaze down into the valley, you bite into a locally grown apple. While stretching, you awe at the symphony of fall colors and plan out the rest of your day. Shall you take a swim in the local watering hole, play a few rounds on the links, rally some tennis balls or take a day trip to a nearby brewery? This is autumn in Vermont.

Between all the hikes, bonfires, swimming, biking and so on, there’s still one thing even the longest summer can’t make me forget… winter. Labor Day is celebrated nationwide and is the unofficial mark (for most) that summer is over. This holiday weekend has become a bittersweet time for those in love with the endless days of sunshine and tan lines. I, on the other hand, see Labor Day Weekend as a milestone counting down the days to the first snowfall.

This means there are fewer than 80 days to get ready for the season. While many are thinking about what new gear to buy or where to bring their old digs for a sharpen and wax, I’m concerned about my physical shape. I want to get the most out of my money. When I buy a lift ticket, I plan on lapping the lift until last call. If I’m not prepared, I’ll be the person huddled next to a heater in a base lodge. I don’t want to be huddled there tired, sore and hungry. No one wants to be that guy!

It’s important not to discount the physical beating your body takes when skiing and riding; it’s something to prepare for. Ready or not, Stratton’s chairlifts will start spinning. In an effort to jump start my winter training I’ve made a ‘to-do list’ that to keep me on track.

  1. Complete the 7 Summits Challenge – I’m looking to build my endurance and leg strength so I can go from first chair to Après with ease.
  2. Strengthen my core in the gym – Here’s a circuit I like to do from Men’s Health Magazine:
    seated ab crunchSeated ab crunch
    Sit on a flat bench, gripping the edges. Lean back, extending your legs. Then bend your knees and raise your legs to your chest. Lean your upper body forwards, bringing your chest towards your thighs. Aim for 12 reps.

    mb leg dropMedicine ball leg-drops
    Lie face-up and squeeze a light med ball between your ankles. Start with your legs straight up then lower them without touching the floor. Return to the start position as fast as possible. That’s 1 rep. Do 10-12.

    weighted one side crunchWeighted one-sided crunch
    Lie back, knees bent and feet flat. Hold a dumbbell with both hands by your right shoulder. Curl your torso up and rotate to the left, then lower back down. Perform 8-10 reps on one side, switch and repeat with the dumbbell by your left shoulder.

    cable crunchKneeling cable crunch
    Kneel facing the pulley of a cable machine with a rope attached high. Hold the ends of the rope near sides of face. Crunch three times in total: first aim your chest at your pelvis, then aim at your left knee, then at your right. That’s 1 rep.

    Perform 10

    burpee1 Burpee
    Get into a regular squat-thrust position: arms shoulder-width apart, hands on the floor with your legs tucked up to your chest. This is both your start and finish stance.

    burpee2Kick your legs back to a press-up position and lower yourself for a push-up before jumping back into start position.

    From here, thrust your body upwards, using your legs and core muscles to launch yourself burpee3from the ground.

    Do 3 sets of 20 reps.

  3. Attend two yoga classes a week – I plan on increasing my flexibility as it’s very important.

What are you doing to get ready for the season?

Let’s Ride!

By Adam Wanamaker

What is a glade skiing, powder-stash steward to do when the snow melts in southern Vermont? The most obvious answer is to go hiking.

Hiking is relaxing. It affords 360o movement on the mountain, an opportunity to explore and discover hidden nooks and crannies typically buried in the winter, a chance to meet some of the diverse wildlife and discover the down-right mesmerizing plant life that makes you swear James Cameron spent time in the Green Mountains during his “research” phase for Avatar. Hiking is great exercise, but it’s not the only way to get out and enjoy summer in the mountains.

Cue my personally preferred form of transportation, entertainment, excitement, and dopamine in non-snow bearing months; my mountain bike. It’s not often that two people get back from an hour-long hike and can, without saying a word, connect with a smile, a head tilt, or raising a glass with a mutual respect knowing exactly what the person across the way—a complete stranger perhaps—is thinking. In winter this happens regularly on a powder day in the lift line or in your preferred—ahem—establishment at the end of the day, and it happens after a mountain biking session, too.

Thankfully there is an increasingly large and dedicated community of mountain bike enthusiasts and land owners cropping up around the Stratton area, with most of the trail systems having opened or reopened to public access, planned, and constructed only within the past three years. Momentum is building around the mountain bike movement and clubs like the Manchester & The Mountain’s Bike Club have been busily building trails, organizing group rides, and taking the proverbial torch forward in making a cohesive community with a vision and a mission that area businesses and the Chamber of Commerce have been supporting around mountain biking. That’s why I implore you to go to your local bike shop in Southern Vermont and ask about trails. Not only will you get some great , non-Googleable info, but this is one of the few things where the internet hasn’t kept up entirely with the full-throttle work that’s being done to make steep mountains covered in ankle-deep mud not just rideable, but fun places to get your dopamine fix flying through the trees until winter comes back around. If I can’t convince you to revisit mountain biking or give it a spin for the first time, maybe this kid can.

About the author:

Adam Wanamaker got lost in his neighborhood the day he learned to ride a bike; although just 10 houses down his block, he’d broken into never-before seen territory. After biking all around greater Binghamton, NY and driving to ski Stratton on weekends in winter, he started at Stratton after graduating SUNY Binghamton. Three years ago he was part of a group on resort that started The Activity Hub, where he eventually became the supervisor of The Hub and more recently the Nordic Center. He loves exploring Vermont’s trails but prefers “bush whacking” to find new hidden Green Mountain gems and writing biographies in third person.

Katie Mallia named 2014 VARA Development Coach of the Year

Posted by David Edry

Jun 11th, 5:34pm

10437310_483557878456848_954416269_nI want to share some exciting Stratton Ski Racing news! Stratton’s Head U12 Coach, Katie Mallia, has been named as the 2014 VARA (Vermont Alpine Racing Assoc.) Development Coach of the Year!! Woohoo!! She’ll receive her official recognition and award at the 2014 VARA Gala this fall. This is exciting news and reinforces that Stratton Racing is moving to the front up in Vermont! Katie’s leadership, knowledge, and connections with the kids and coaches is a model for the club. These recognitions are important and we’re all thrilled and proud of Katie!

The Benefits of Not Training

team-watermelon-preraceOur guest blogger this month is Lauren, an RRCA certified coach and the mastermind behind Health on the Run. Her running and wellness blog has been a favorite among the sneakered set since 2010. Since then, she and her husband have started a new life (and a new family!) in Southern Vermont. Follow her adventures in running in the Green Mountains.

 

This blog was originally written in July 2013, but the content is timeless. Enjoy!

Some runners run purely for recreation. A few miles a couple of times a week, just to stay in shape/burn off calories/eat that extra slice (or three!) of pizza on Friday night.

While I can’t argue with the fact that these are great benefits (and I’ve used running to justify splurges more than once), I personally need more out of the sport. Like many of you reading this, I thrive off actively training — the goal setting, the hard work, the endorphins, the races. I complain about it sometimes (of course), but I generally like the structure of a training schedule. It keeps me accountable, keeps me motivated, and helps me feel accomplished. For the past several years, I’ve gone right from one training cycle to the next…hitting a goal, resetting, working towards another. I love the sense of order and consistency it brings to my life.

But that kind of schedule can also lead to burnout. And now that I’m not training (not really), I have to admit that there are some very nice benefits to the time off. Especially when it’s summer in Vermont, and you don’t have to worry about fitting in your long run when there’s all sorts of other fun outdoor adventures to be had.

I still set goals for myself each week. I track my workouts, and come up with a set number of days I want to run and a certain number of miles I want to hit. Of course it’s all sort of arbitrary at this point, but it’s really the only thing that keeps me motivated. And the structure brings a sense of normalcy to an otherwise crazy time.

Sometimes, however, it’s good to put those goals to the side…something that’s a lot easier to do when there’s no race on the line. No one really cares how many miles I run every week except for me, and running isn’t the only form of physical activity (sometimes it’s easy to forget this when I’m in the middle of a training cycle!). In fact, there are other things I like doing just as much.

cascade falls_1

Like spending the day hiking up a nearby mountain.

cascade falls_17weeks

It’s so funny to me how I can feel absolutely fine (and like my old self) while running a race, but not while walking at an easy pace…well, not when that walk involves climbing a mountain, anyway. I love hiking, but it’s embarrassing how easily I get out of breath now. And I don’t particularly like the fact that I’m lagging behind Evan the entire way.

But, other than my damaged pride, hiking really is a great workout. And I can’t think of many other ways I’d rather spend a day. If there ever comes a day when I give up running for good, I think I’ll just dedicate my life to hiking mountains all over the country.

On Saturday, we headed to Mt Ascutney, the site of the crazy trail race I ran last fall (but not the same trail). It was a tough, but beautiful hike. About halfway up, we stopped for lunch at the top of a waterfall. Eating sandwiches with our feet hanging off the edge of the “world” and the endless green mountains all around is basically my idea of heaven on earth.

weathersfield trail_cascadefalls lunch

cascade falls_viewPictures don’t really do it justice

The day was humid, but not overly hot, which made it perfect for hiking. And although it was a little cloudy at the top, the mountain ranges still seemed to stretch on forever.

Mt Ascutney_top

Have I mentioned lately just how much I love Vermont?

On our way back home, we happened to drive by an orchard advertising freshly picked berries. So we just had to stop to pick up some strawberries and blueberries, which we devoured within 24 hours (in the form of strawberry shortcake and blueberry pancakes).

The next day we continued our Vermont adventures by running from another waterfall…this time, one that’s a fairly well-known spot for swimming on hot summer days. We drove out there with our towels and ran an easy (hot!) 4 miles out and back from the falls. The sole purpose of the run was to work up enough of a sweat so that the icy cold water would actually feel refreshing.

Turns out, it’s going to take a lot more than a 4-mile run on a hot sunny July day to make that water feel good. It was so cold that going under momentarily took my breath away.

buttermilk falls

But there’s nothing quite like an ice bath in a Vermont river. I think if I could finish every run at a waterfall/swimming hole, I’d be way more likely to take regular ice baths during training.

IMG 3913

And if I can spend every weekend frolicking in the Green Mountains, I’d say life is pretty good. Living in Vermont has its downsides, but weekends like this past one remind me why we chose to live in this state…and how lucky we are to be here, no matter how long it ends up being.

And I have to admit that it makes me pretty happy to not have any sort of long race to train for. There will always be another training cycle. I plan to enjoy this downtime as much as I possibly can.

10 Reasons to Ditch the Garmin

team-watermelon-preraceOur guest blogger this month is Lauren, an RRCA certified coach and the mastermind behind Health on the Run. Her running and wellness blog has been a favorite among the sneakered set since 2010. Since then, she and her husband have started a new life (and a new family!) in Southern Vermont. Follow her adventures in running in the Green Mountains.

 

This blog was originally written in December 2011, but the content is timeless. Enjoy!

 

***

Up until a couple of years ago, I rarely ran with a watch if I could help it. And when I did wear one, it was usually because I was running for time instead of distance. Which meant that unless I went and mapped out the route later, there wasn’t any way to tell what pace I was running. The year I qualified for Boston, I timed myself on treadmill runs (you can’t really avoid that) and long runs, not because I wanted to keep a specific pace, but because I wanted to have a general idea of how long it took me to run 20 miles. Those long run times were the only running “data” that I had going into the marathon. That year, I managed to take 19.5 minutes off my marathon time – my biggest marathon PR to date.

But then I got a fancy Garmin as a gift, and this girl who once loved running free and un-timed suddenly became a slave to numbers. I thought I would hate all that feedback, and would hate always seeing my pace in front of me or exactly how far I had gone. But the truth is – it was love at first run. I loved not only having data on the run, but also being able to upload it and see what my runs looked like over time. I loved that I could run in any direction, without any sort of plan, and still know how far and fast I had gone that day. In short, I was hooked.

ifyouseemecollapse_ Health on the Run

I know many of you feel the same way about these little wrist computers. They’re a great tool to have when you are actively training for something. But they’re also incredibly easy to become addicted to. And even though I just spent the first part of this post talking about how much I love my Garmin, sometimes I think the dependence becomes too much. Like so many others I read about, I became a little obsessed with seeing the numbers on every run. If I got ready to run and found out that my Garmin wasn’t charged, it threw everything off. “But how will I run without knowing how fast I’m going every single step of the way??” It’s a little ridiculous, really.

Now that I’m not actively in training, I’ve decided to ditch the Garmin – for most runs. And instead of feeling panic at the loss of so much “valuable” data, I can tell you that it’s been wonderful. So wonderful, that I think it’s something you should do too.

10 Reasons to Ditch the Garmin (for now)

It’s true – runners love their numbers. Average pace, fastest race times, miles per week, miles that need to be run at X pace in order to hit X time – our life revolves around them. I know breaking the cycle by ditching the Garmin has been discussed before, but here are 10 reasons why I think it can be great to run without the feedback. I promise it won’t kill you.

1.) Break the addiction

Pure and simple – you won’t break your dependence on the watch if you never let yourself run without it. I know this seems obvious, but you need to give yourself more than one day. Running watch-less multiple days a week will help you break free of your dependence. I promise it may feel weird at first, but that’ll soon pass. After a few days, seeing an uncharged Garmin before you head out the door on your run won’t even phase you.

2.) Stop worrying about mileage

I am one of those runners who, when I get to the end of what was supposed to be a 5 mile loop and see 4.83 miles on my watch instead, will run up and down the street until I get to exactly 5 miles. Why? I could tell you that it’s because those last .17 miles are just so important, but really it’s because I just like seeing the even number on my watch. Plus, who wants to go out and run 4.83 miles? That’s not as good as 5, right? Five full miles will make me a better runner – 4.83 ? Not worth it.

The beauty of it all is – once you ditch the watch you won’t know whether you went exactly 5 miles or not. And you’ll find that you don’t even care, leaving you free to actually finish the run right in front of your house, instead of 3 blocks down the street.

3.) Stop worrying about pace

Even on days when I’m not trying to run for pace, it’s hard to not keep checking the watch to see how I’m doing. If it tells me that I’m running slower than I want to be, there’s a huge part of me that wants to pick up the pace until it’s back where I like it. Even if I manage to not look at the watch during the run, I still know that the time is being recorded, ready for me to pick apart and analyze later. Running without a watch is the only way that I really, truly don’t care how fast or slow I’m going. I just run.

4.) Embrace the freedom

It’s amazing how freeing it can feel to just shed one little piece of running equipment. There are no paces to hit, no exact mileage to run. Just you and the road.

5.) Run simpler

That freedom you get from ditching the watch takes you back to the simplest form of running. How fast or far you run doesn’t matter. Instead, the run is just about being out there, about experiencing the miles, and getting back to the reasons you fell in love with running in the first place.

6.) Zone out on the run

Besides the fact that you never actually get anywhere, one reason people hate running on a treadmill so much is because of the constant feedback. You can’t escape the monitor that tells you how far you’re running, how fast you’re going, how many calories you’ve burned, and (if you just grab onto the handrails) your heart rate. The watch does the exact same thing – it just lets you know all that stuff without being chained to a treadmill. Having so much feedback all the time makes it really hard to zone out. The watch beeps, you have an urge to glance down at the numbers, you check to see how much further you have to go. None of that helps you “get in the zone.” Ditching the watch gives you less to think about, making it easier to spend the run getting lost in your own thoughts.

7.) Your arm stays warmer

Okay so this may not be at the top of your priority list, but if you ditch the watch your forearm is likely to stay much warmer this winter. It’s amazing how great NOT having a huge chunk of metal against your skin or having to lift a layer or two to see the numbers on the watch feels.

garmin-layers {health on the run}

8.) Easy runs become easy again

I’m one of those runners who has certain paces in my head that I feel like I should be hitting, and paces I don’t really like to go above even on easy days. But running is weird. We all know that some days a certain pace will feel so effortless while other days we’re struggling to hang on. So when I go out for what is supposed to be an easy run and see that my pace is a lot slower than it feels like I’m running, instead of telling myself that I obviously need the extra rest today so should slow it down, I push through, often trying to speed up a little in the final miles. At the end of the run, I may have hit the arbitrary pace that I feel is acceptable, but I haven’t exactly had a nice, easy, recovery day either.

When there isn’t any feedback to tell me otherwise, I run as slow as my body wants to go. It may seem silly that I can’t do this normally, but it’s all a part of the “Garmin Effect.”

Which brings me to…

9.) Relieve the pressure and run stress-free

Wearing that watch can put an unnecessary amount of pressure on you. Just like I described above, when you know something is always recording how fast you’re moving, it creates pressure to hit certain paces. I know this isn’t completely logical. No one (literally no one) cares how fast I complete that 7 mile run except for me. But when I’m being timed, it’s as though the stakes are higher. That run will be recorded forever. Everyone will know I ran slow today. And I will be annoyed with myself that I couldn’t hold the pace I wanted to.

Getting rid of the watch means removing that pressure – the pressure to hit a certain pace, the stress of getting caught behind a group of walkers or a slower runner who might mess up your average pace for that mile, the stress of getting stuck at a stoplight or stop sign (should I pause my watch? Try to sprint across? My pace is ruined! My watch will say I’m slow when I’m really not!)…all of that will be gone.

10.) Become more in tune with your body

Finally, and most importantly, running watch free means that you can’t rely on a piece of technology to tell you how fast you are running, or should be running. Instead you just run by feel. When you don’t have the numbers to tell you if you’re hitting a recovery pace or a tempo pace, you are forced to look inward. A few weeks of running watch-less can help you become more in tune with your own body. You’ll know an easy pace because you know what it feels like to run it – the rate of your breathing, the length of your stride – these will help you determine how fast you’re running, not the watch.

When marathon training starts up again in January, I’m sure my Garmin and I will be reunited. Like I said, the watch can be an incredibly useful tool. But that doesn’t mean you need to run with it all the time. If you find yourself tied to your Garmin, I encourage you to give it a break even if just for a few weeks. After awhile, you might find that you don’t even really miss it…

Make The Most Of Your Time At Stratton

By Lauren Suriani

Is this your first time here? Maybe it’s your second. Heck maybe you’ve been coming here for years. This is a bit of an insider guide to having the best time on the mountain. Whether it’s a Saturday morning or a Wednesday afternoon, these tips will help you have a great time at Stratton.

Where to Find the Best Snow

• Pay attention to wind direction. Ski the same side of the trail as the wind direction.

• If it’s windy and snowmaking was taking place the night before, ski the trails downwind from snowmaking guns. Ex. Snowmaking on Suntanner during a west wind, ski Yodeler first thing.

• Ski/Ride the trails that get the most traffic first. Ex. Ski Black Bear first thing, then work to Kidderbrook later in the day.

• Riding the gondi (gondola) is nice, but stick to the chairs if you want to find the best snow. They allow you to see and hear better. Watch where other skiers are going and listen, hearing the sound their skies or board makes can tell you a lot about the snow..

• Get here early on a powder day! If you really feel up for it, hike before the lifts open. I promise you, it will be worth it.

Avoid the Line

• Avoid the Base Lodge at lunch time. Try eating earlier or later and check out Sun Bowl and Mid-Mountain. (Mid Mt. have the best donuts on weekends!) Hint: Lift lines are short at noon since everyone else is inside eating.

• Avoid the Main Base. Check out Sun Bowl. It’s usually sunny and lines are generally shorter.

• If Shooting Star is running, use it! The lines are always shorter than URSA and it takes you to the same place.

• Get here early.

• Buy your lift ticket the night before; less waiting in the morning.

• Singles lines rarely work. Make a group of 6 or meet some new fiends and create a full group.

Have an Awesome Time

• Call the snow phone in the morning to get an idea what conditions will be like for the day. 802.297.4134

• Pack everything the night before. No stress in the AM.

• Get your skis/board tuned. Try First Run in Stratton Village. Skiing/riding on a fresh tune is just more fun, period. The best time to get a tune is right before new snow falls or when the snow is icy and firm.

• Come early or show up late. Early gets you a great parking spot and fresh groomed runs. Show up mid-morning like everyone else and be prepared to be patient. Show up after lunch for smaller crowds, sneak into a good parking spot and ski some bumps or small moguls! Sweet!

• Cool down. An old instructor trick is to ski an easy run on the last run of the day. You may feel comfortable and confident from a full day on the hill but take the advice, end your day on an easier run and a good note, you’ll be more eager to come back!

A Hot Spot for Alpine Boarding

By Courtney DiFiore

Like many that live in Southern Vermont, I too share a deep love for the outdoors. In the winter season, you can find me shredding the mountain on my snowboard most of the time, but I can ski as well. I don’t share the same love for it as riding but it is a nice change. Another on-hill sport I’ve been dying to try since I first learned about the sport is Alpine boarding.

Alpine boarding is similar to snowboarding in that you have both feet strapped to one board, but there are some major differences. The board is longer, stiffer, more narrow and designed only to be ridden in one direction. The boots used are hard shell boots, similar to a ski boot, but softer and significantly more comfortable. The bindings are more rigid than a freestyle binding and in conjunction with the hard boot, provide greater control over the edge of the board.

Because Alpine snowboarding is such a niche sport, finding equipment locally is near impossible. This is why getting the chance to participate in the East Coast Expression Session (ECES) was so exciting for me! ECES comes to Stratton every other year providing demos and clinics for Alpine boards.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/O5DVeTZtDGU]

ECES set up a tent in the main base area February 26-28 allowing anyone interested to demo and learn more about the sport. On Thursday, I took the plunge and demoed a Donek Alpine Board. Todd Brown, one of the many that make up our local contingent of passionate carvers at Stratton, helped me on my first run. He used the Gondola ride to the summit to prep me with some need to know info like: it’ll probably feel a little weird at first, getting up is the hardest part, it’s important to set your edge before leaning into the hill  and so on.

The bindings for Alpine boards are comparable to step in bindings for a snowboard; it’s really quick. Once I was clipped into the board and ready to ride, Brown set sail for Janeway Jct. and the Meadows. Talking me through it, Brown and I cruised back to the main base focusing on locking in my edge before I tried leaning into the turn.

I was surprised at how easy it was. I’m no professional, but I’d definitely say the learning curve is a small one if you’re already an experienced snowboarder. Though I was ready to start taking turns on my own to practice, I decided instead to join the woman’s clinic ECES was holding. What a great group of ladies! They were so motivating, encouraging and educational.

If you’re looking for more information on the sport or equipment, see www.bomberonline.com. Bomber Industries is the largest US supporter of Alpine Snowboarding and is a one stop shop for equipment and information including a very active online forum.